Debian GNU/Linux 2.2 ('potato') Release Information

Debian GNU/Linux 2.2 (a.k.a. Potato) was released on August 14th, 2000. The latest point release of Debian 2.2 is 2.2r7, released on July 13th, 2002.

Debian GNU/Linux 2.2 has been obsoleted by Debian GNU/Linux 3.0 ("woody"). Security updates are discontinued as of June 30th, 2003. Please see the security team survey results for more information.

For information on the major changes in this release, please refer to the Release Notes and to the official press release.

Debian GNU/Linux 2.2 is dedicated to the memory of Joel "Espy" Klecker, a Debian developer, unbeknownst to most of the Debian Project, was bedridden and fighting a disease known as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy during most of his involvement with Debian. Only now is the Debian Project realizing the extent of his dedication, and the friendship he bestowed upon us. So as a show of appreciation, and in memory of his inspirational life, this release of Debian GNU/Linux is dedicated to him.

Debian GNU/Linux 2.2 is available from the Internet or from CD vendors, please see the Distribution page for more information on getting Debian.

The following architectures are supported in this release:

Before installing Debian, please read the Installation Manual. The Installation Manual for your target architecture contains instructions and links for all the files you need to install. You might also be interested in the installation guide for Debian 2.2, which is an on line tutorial.

If you are using APT, you can use the following lines in your /etc/apt/sources.list file to be able to access potato packages:

  deb potato main contrib non-free
  deb potato/non-US main non-free

Read the apt-get(8) and the sources.list(5) manual pages for more information.

Contrary to our wishes, there are some problems that exist in the potato release, even though it is declared stable. We've made a list of the major known problems, and you can always report other issues to us.

Data integrity is granted by a digitally signed Release file. To ensure that all files in the release belong to it, MD5 checksums of all Packages files are copied into the Release file. Digital signatures for this file are stored in the file Release.gpg, using this key: ftpmaster.

To verify the Release file, you'll have to fetch both files and execute gpg --verify Release.gpg Release after importing the keys it is signed with.

Last but not least, we have a list of people who take credit for making this release happen.